[New Book] Sexuality after War Rape: From Narrative to Embodied Research

Sexuality after War Rape
From Narrative to Embodied Research
By Nena Močnik

This book examines the potential impact of rape survivors’ traumatic experiences in post-conflict zones. With specific attention given to the experiences of women who were sexually abused during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, it addresses the sexuality of survivors, which has so far been inadequately researched, and challenges the stereotypical and victimized images and narrations that have so far prevailed in academic and public discourse about women survivors while exploring the effects of those narratives on the political, social and economic status of the survivors themselves.… Read the rest

[NEW BOOK] Managing Ambiguity. How Clientelism, Citizenship, and Power Shape Personhood in Bosnia and Herzegovina

“Managing Ambiguity. How Clientelism, Citizenship, and Power Shape Personhood in Bosnia and Herzegovina”. Berghahn Books. 2017

Carna Brkovic

http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/BrkovicManaging

Why do people turn to personal connections to get things done? Exploring the role of favors in social welfare systems in postwar, postsocialist Bosnia and Herzegovina, this volume provides a new theoretical angle on links between ambiguity and power. It demonstrates that favors were not an instrumental tactic of survival, nor a way to reproduce oneself as a moral person. Instead, favors enabled the insertion of personal compassion into the heart of the organization of welfare.… Read the rest

[New Book] Feminist Activism at War: Belgrade and Zagreb Feminists in the 1990s

Feminist Activism at War: Belgrade and Zagreb Feminists in the 1990s
A. Miskovska Kajevska

Routledge, 2017

About the Book
This book describes, compares, explains, and contextualises the positionings, i.e. discourses and activities, which feminists in Belgrade, Serbia and Zagreb, Croatia produced in relation to the (post-)Yugoslav wars of the 1990s. Two types of positionings are analysed: those which the feminists have produced on the (sexual) war violence and those which they have produced on each other.

Applying a Bourdieuian framework and using interviews with key feminist and peace activists in the region alongside a thorough examination of organisational documents and printed media articles, Ana Miskovska Kajevska challenges the common suggestion that the outbreak of the war violence in 1991 led to the same reorganisation of the Belgrade and Zagreb feminist fields.… Read the rest